Feeds:
Posts
Comments

As the show came to an end, the people attending were left in gushing tears of uninhibited emotion. Reading this news from numerous sources, I personally do not see how a fashion show could move an entire crowd into genuine sobs, a feat almost unheard of behind the cold, critical gaze of editors behind their shielded sunglasses. This was due to the intimate approach that Stephano and Domenico chose to experiment.

Playing in the background throughout the entire runway was a video displayed across a large projected screen. From this video, the crowd absorbed the process that went into making the collection. The absolute perfection of the tailoring and construction was admirable, but it was the beauty of the love that Stephano and Domenico put into making these clothes which really blew everyone, including me from my computer screen, away.

Critics in the past say that designers are really exploring their roots, but this saying has become a cliche and commonplace. Every season when critics have nothing left to say, they slap a bunch of big mumble-jumble words together to attempt to sound as if they’re more sophisticated than everyone else. So, in light of this collection, I would just like to say that this time, the designers truly explored their DNA, creating a show full of their authentic classics which they have built their brand off of, and created a video to show the magical element they experienced while making the clothes.

The clothes in themselves were sexy, high quality lingerie-esque clothing, but tailored to perfection. Flawless tailoring was fully implemented throughout the collection in the form of jackets with lace peeking out in an ever-so-suggestive way. There were satin slips which were overlaid with the sexy lace trim, or a full on satin dress styled with gold headphones. Slinky red luscious velvet also crept onto the runway, proving yet again the special touch that Dolce and Gabbana have for creating beautiful clothes out of the most difficult fabrics. The collection then progressed into sheer polka dot dresses and leopard prints which normally I am not a fan of but in this case they were lovely. This collection didn’t break any new boundaries, but instead brushed up on what makes the brand and creating the most classic of the looks in the most beautiful way.

After watching this show, I could see why so many had tears in their eyes, but I wasn’t one of those who broke down crying after a fashion show. I take it that the past few seasons have been all about drama and party clothes and ┬áthe fact that these clothes are so simplistic and down-to-earth is too much for the critics to handle, yet I still did not feel like it was like someone had died there. Maybe that’s another reason: everyone is really sensitive since the death of Alexander Mcqueen, a truly iconic person. Maybe it was the music, which played a bittersweet melody from Moulin Rouge. The true reason I believe is that people are tired of seeing clothes without a message. That takes the meaning out of what they do; so the fact that Marc Jacobs and Dolce and Gabbana thought this differently really makes us question why fashion matters. It is for when shows like this one happen.

Prada RTW Fall 2010 – WWD.com.

Featured at Prada this fall, are clothes of all assortments; However, only for the average grandma from the fifties. Raving reviews were given yet my view is that these clothes look so archaic they belong in a cellar (if you were to still use that term). Prada herself called it “sexy” but her view of sexy must be holed up in a rocking chair, knitting away for hours on end while drinking tea with honey. She also claimed that there was an emphasis on breasts, which vulgar as it sounds, was clearly not present. From the cut of the clothes to the color palette, everything spoke matronly and old.

I suppose sexy and hot to fashion people is subtle, as WWD writes, “sex appeal — this collection had plenty.” Yet the collection began with a long sleeved A-line dress bearing no skin, with darts clearly displayed in the boob area and a hint of black lace (reminiscent of curtains) at the bottom hemline of the dress. This look was completed with grey socks appealing to only people over the age of 95, and was topped with a pointy toed shoe. Tell me what’s sexy about that. Clearly, this collection was so amazing it blew my brains out *cough cough*.

The collection progressed into what normal people would call a curtain-on-a-woman. There was also this interesting wallpaper textile which I think Prada was trying to interpret as a walking wall, or something similar to one. This wallpaper design came not only in one color, but multicolored hues, for all of you who want a different wallpaper dress to wear for every occasion.

Some other intriguing details were explosions of ruffles where a woman’s boobs would be, I suppose this was a halfhearted attempt at making them appear bigger. Also, the cable knit collar; a most popular knit favored by grandmas who enjoy exploring their knitting techniques.

One thing that disturbed me (not that the entire collection didn’t) was that in an effort to keep up with trends, Prada cut holes out of some of the dresses so that the stomach was exposed, and the effect achieved was a dress that looked like someone decided to pull a prank on some poor grandma by cutting out a section of her favorite dress.

Towards the end there were a couple fascinating dresses with ornate beading in them. Too bad they were all black so it was hard to see this stunning revolution in granny fashion. Then at the end there was a textile that looked as if it was copied from the marbling paint technique. A very baroque looking wallpaper print.

This conservative exploration into the depths of the granny archive made for an entertaining show to not only attack with sarcastic, cynical comments, but to also fuss meticulously over the many details that made this show such an awful collection which I have absolutely no clue whatsoever as to why people gushed over it.

Enjoy
and feel free to criticize through comment!

Experiments with flash

Notice those innocent Asian ladies with their funny white sunglasses staring right at my camera. They’re like “peek-a-boo!” right around that man in front.

Interesting trend going on in SF. Could you convince my parents that motorcycling is just the same as driving a car?